Core Team

 

Émélie Desrochers-Turgeon

Émélie is a Vanier Scholar and a PhD student at the Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism, Carleton University. She explores issues of settler colonialism, landscape representation, language, architectural imagination, and the display of architecture. She completed a BA in Environmental Design at UQÀM and an MA in Architecture at McGill University.

Before starting her doctoral studies, she worked in various design firms specializing in industrial design, architecture and landscape architecture in Montreal and Berlin. She has collaborated on various exhibitions presented at the Centre de Design in Montreal, the Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec and the Canadian Museum of History. Émélie’s writing, art work, and architectural thesis project have been featured in Canadian Architect, Esquisse, KERB and SITE. 

More recently, she has worked on a research project at The Historical Archives of Contemporary Arts (ASAC) in Venice, Italy where she explored how the architecture and the curatorial practices of the Canadian Pavilion has responded to imperatives of self-representation.

Catherine Bonier

Catherine is an Assistant Professor at the Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism, and currently acts as coordinator of the school’s urbanism major. She earned her professional MArch and her PhD in Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania, and a BA in History from Harvard College. She was a 2012 fellow of the Philadelphia Consortium for History of Science, Technology, and Medicine. She is co-founder and co-director, with Ozayr Saloojee, of the Carleton Urban Research Lab (c-url).

Catherine’s ongoing research centers on the shaping of the built environment around water, infrastructure, and competing ideas of health and balance. Her past positions in construction management, mental health counseling, and video game design contribute to her focus on the multivalent effects of technologies on the development of sustainable architectural and environmental designs. Catherine has written on issues of equilibrium and equity in relation to water and waterfronts, and recently organized the Working Waterfronts, Freshwater Fictions symposium at Carleton University on this topic.

Jerzy Elżanowski 

Jerzy Elżanowski explores the relationships between architecture, violence and commemoration in Europe and Canada. His current research projects focus on the cartography of urban war damage as well as on recent commemorative strategies in Ottawa as they pertain to Fascism and Communism. He experiments with joint architectural and humanities pedagogies, both in his teaching and through collaborative projects in the fields of heritage conservation and curatorial studies.  

Jerzy is Assistant Professor in Indigenous and Canadian Studies (Heritage Conservation) at Carleton University, jointly appointed to the Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art and Culture, and the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism.  He holds a professional Master’s degree in Architecture from McGill University and a joint PhD in Heritage Conservation, Architectural History, and Interdisciplinary Studies from the Bauhaus University Weimar and the University of British Columbia. He has taught and practiced in the fields of architecture and heritage conservation in Canada, Germany, and Poland. Most recently, Jerzy concluded a six-month visiting appointment as Mercator Fellow (German Research Foundation) with the Identität und Erbe(Identity and Heritage) research group at the Technical University Berlin.

David Hugill

David is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies at Carleton University. He completed his PhD at York University and his post-doctorate at Simon Fraser University.

He is a broadly trained human geographer with research interests in urban geography, colonial urbanisms, and urban political ecology. In recent years, his work on these topics has appeared in a number of scholarly journals including Settler Colonial Studies, Human Geography, the Middle West Review, and Geography Compass. He is currently completing a research monograph titled Settler Colonialism and the Making of Modern Minneapolis (under contract with the University of Minnesota Press) and is co-editor of an edited collection titled Settler City Limits (forthcoming from the University of Manitoba Press and Michigan State University Press).

Karen Lutsky

Karen is an assistant professor of landscape architecture in the University of Minnesota’s College of Design. She is founder and director of the UMN Great Lakes Design Labs, and an associate of the UMN Institute on the Environment. She completed her BA in Environment and Society from Brandeis University and her MLA from the University of Pennsylvania.

Karen’s work and research asks how designers might better design ‘with’ changing conditions and develop a ‘culture of adaptability’ that values and engages ‘uncertainty’. She is currently working on a book with landscape architecture professor Sean Burkholder to be published by Pittsburgh Press on a landscape architecture approach to the littoral landscapes of the Great Lakes. Her writing and creative works can be found in Places Online Journal, Scenario Journal, and in the recent Third Coast Atlas publication.

Ozayr Saloojee

Ozayr is an Associate Professor at the Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism, where he is associate director of the graduate program and co-directs the Carleton Urban Research Lab (c-url). Born and raised in Johannesburg, South Africa, he received his B.Arch and M.Arch II at Carleton University and his PhD. from the Bartlett School of Architecture at University College London. He taught for 12 years at the University of Minnesota where he was named the 2014-16 Imagine Chair in the Arts, Humanities and Design).

At present, his research and teaching focuses on postcolonial urbanisms, theorizing and problematizing questions of water, infrastructure and cultural and contested geographies. He has presented and published his research in South Africa, Japan, and the United States, Canada and the UK, and has worked on a number of creative projects, including the Mobilizing Materialities exhibition and symposium a partnership with the international World of Matter artists collaborative. In addition to his teaching and work at c-url he is currently working on The Incommensurate Archive, a project that explore space, radical spatial ethnographies and decolonizing archives His work, research and creative practice link critical scholarship, design and artistic practice in writing, publication and exhibitions.

Zoe Todd

Zoe (Métis) is from amiskwaciwaskâhikan (Edmonton), which is located in Treaty Six Territory in Alberta, Canada. She is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University, and is currently a visiting professor at Yale University in New Haven.

Zoe researches fish, colonialism and legal-governance relations between Indigenous peoples and the Canadian State. In the past, she has researched human-fish relations in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region and has conducted work on Arctic Food Security in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, in the Northwest Territories, Canada. Her current work focuses on the relationships between people and fish in the context of colonialism, environmental change and resource extraction in Treaty Six Territory. Her work employs a critical Indigenous feminist lens to examine the shared relationships between people and their environments and legal traditions in Canada, with a view to understanding how to bring fish and the more-than-human into conversations about Indigenous self-determination, peoplehood, and governance in Canada today.

Johan Voordouw

Johan is an Assistant Professor at the Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism, and a registered architect (ARB, UK). Born in the Netherlands, Johan emigrated to Canada at the age of six. He completed his Bachelor of Environmental Design at the University of Manitoba and his graduate studied at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London.

Johan’s most notable exhibition design is Bi-Giwen: Coming Home (2018). Bi-Giwen is a traveling exhibition designed for the Legacy of Hope Foundation. It described the tragedy and resilience of twelve 60s scoop survivors.

Johan’s own architectural work has been extensively published and exhibited. His Weerkas project was exhibited at International Architecture Biennale in Rotterdam (2014), the Academy of Fine Art in Vienna (2015), and a subsequent solo exhibition at Magazin Gallery, Vienna (2018).

Other projects have been exhibited at the Royal Academy Summer Show London, the Venice Architecture Biennale, and Arup Gallery London.

Émélie Desrochers-Turgeon

Émélie Desrochers-Turgeon

 
Catherine Bonier

Catherine Bonier

 
Jerzy Elżanowski

Jerzy Elżanowski

 
David Hugill

David Hugill

 
Karen Lutsky

Karen Lutsky

 
Ozayr Saloojee

Ozayr Saloojee

 
Zoe Todd

Zoe Todd

 
Johan Voordouw

Johan Voordouw